Posts

Deep Dive: The Travel Industry’s Social Media Marketing Landscape

This deep dive takes a closer look at the social media marketing trends shaping today’s travel industry. How are travel agents using social media to connect with customers? Which social media sites are the most powerful? And most important of all, which techniques are working? 

This analysis is based on Travel Market Report’s recent Outlook on Social Media. We’ve trawled through it and cut it down to the best bits so you don’t have to. 

We hope you find it useful, insightful and packed with takeaways that you can start applying in 2019 and beyond. Enjoy!

Social Media: The Ultimate Equaliser?

When discussing our marketplace software, one theme that constantly comes up is that of competing with the major players. For any agency or tour provider setting up in the travel industry, it’s an uphill battle to even get noticed online. That’s why our proven solution brings smaller providers together in a way that amplifies their reach and evens out the playing field.

But social media works in a different way to search engine rankings. On the one hand, huge industry names are more likely to draw a following and, of course, have bigger budgets to push into direct marketing and content production. But on the other hand, the social media landscape is more egalitarian that search engine rankings.

That’s because it’s a total equaliser. Everyone starts from nothing and even small travel agencies and tour operators can gain a large, loyal following. So long as they use the platforms correctly.

Doing things right is the Holy Grail here. So what can Travel Market Report’s Outlook on Social Media tell us about how travel agencies can position themselves, how brands can rise and fall through social media, and what kind of interactions lead to successful conversations and conversions?

The Importance of Having a Social Media Plan

The rise of Social Media has led to an interesting challenge for all small businesses, not just travel agencies. How do you strike the right balance between building an audience, projecting your philosophy and being goal oriented: driving traffic to your website, selling, that kind of thing?

This balancing act, on top of uncertainty around using Social Media and its tangible benefits, has led to a weird phenomenon around its use for business purposes. For example, the Outlook on Social Media report found that 43% of respondents have a formal social media plan versus 41% who don’t and 16% who weren’t sure.

You read that right: Less than half of the travel agencies surveyed have a formal plan in place for Social Media management.

However, of those agents who said they had generated $25,000 or more in sales from their Social Media
efforts, 59% said they had a social media marketing plan.

So what conclusion can we draw from these findings? Well, for starters, they suggest that having a plan is linked to increased sales through social media channels. But we can’t say why for sure. It might be that having a plan means that posts are more consistent, more cleverly targeted and more thought through.

Or, it could be that travel businesses that approach Social Media with rigour and thoroughness apply those same attributes with great effect to the rest of their operations.

The question of whether or not to adopt a formal Social Media plan gets right to the heart of our uncertainty about using these platforms. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the like have been designed to amplify spontaneity. The last thing many travel agents want to do is come across as contrived (and boring). So perhaps that fear is holding many travel operators from seeing the full potential of Social Media marketing.

Is your travel agency one the many posting inconsistently, without a formal plan, and unsure over what the aims and aspirations are?

Here are three quick tips to get you moving in the right direction…

  • Know your intended audience and post with a purpose. In other words, get yourself a plan, or at least an idea of who you want to target and the kind of content they are going to find inspirational.
  • Don’t get caught up in the rush to gain followers. On platforms like Facebook and Instagram, your ultimate goal is always going to be conversions. More followers doesn’t necessarily mean more conversions. What’s arguably more important is engagement. Buying followers or encouraging follower growth through other devious means is self-defeating and not a good way to start.
  • Keep learning. The social media landscape is constantly changing, so you have to adapt and keep up. So do that however you can: attend webinars, read articles just like this one, continue your own research. Whatever it takes to improve your knowledge of the landscape.

SEO Counts for Social Media, Too

You might think that SEO – Search Engine Optimisation – is strictly related to the content of your website. But Social Media platforms are part of the internet too, so there are techniques you can apply across the board.

The algorithms that determine the content on Social Media platforms are also similar to those that govern Google search results. For example, users on Instagram often rely on keywords to find the content they like and are interested in. Plus, the amount of engagement a post gets will dictate how widely it gets pushed.

how are travel companies using social media to sell?

There is a quite staggering admission from respondents in the Outlook On Social Media survey: 40% didn’t know what SEO is and only 23% apply it to Social Media operations.

A related contention was that nearly 60% of respondents don’t use or track hash tags or weren’t sure. As the primary way that people discover content they are interested in on platforms such as Twitter and Instagram, that is pretty unforgivable from a large number of travel agencies.

55% of respondents who said they had sold at least $25,000 via their social media efforts do use hash tags. #TheProofIsInThePudding.

Social Media Analytics: Testing Your Methods

The running theme here is that travel agents and advisors are perhaps not taking the potential of Social Media marketing seriously enough.

That is borne out in our next statistic. Just over half (51%) of agencies use the analytics provided by social media to gather information about their target audience. And only 37% of travel advisors use analytics to gauge the effectiveness of their own social media efforts.

Social Media is crowded and competitive space, so keeping tabs on your methods and results is the only way you’re going to improve. Best of all, every platform provides insights and metrics into the performance of your posts, so there’s no excuse not to test and track your results.

What Type Of Social Media Posts Appeal to Travellers?

We’ve written at length in the past about Social Media tips for professionals working in the travel industry. We’ve also discussed the power of an effective video strategy and the impact of video content from a content marketing perspective.

There are few industries as reliant on visuals than travel. Beautiful, aspirational photos and videos are often what it takes to push travellers toward a particular destination and make a sale happen. They are the means through which a compelling story is told.

The proof is there for all to see. Posts on platforms like Twitter and Facebook tend to receive more engagement if images or videos are included. While videos on landing pages can increase conversions by up to 80%.

More than two-thirds of agents (68%) who responded to the survey said they use video in their social media.

Significantly, around 79% of those respondents who said they had sold at least $25,000 worth of travel via social media in the past year said they use video. 

So what about the general theme of posts? What have travel industry professionals found to be the most effective? As you’d expect, at the top of the list are the most visual posts: Photography from the travel of agents themselves (65%) and beautiful travel photography (63%).

But then there are more conventional marketing tools: 62% of agents found special offers to be an effective form of content.

Interestingly, it appears as though travellers aren’t so keen on hearing about practical things or negatives. Only 28% of agents found it effective to post travel alerts about weather or other disruptions.

Social Media Objectives & Lead Generation

A running theme through Travel Market Report’s research is that many industry professionals aren’t exactly sure what they are doing on Social Media, what their aims are and how to measure success.

It would appear as though we are in an experimental phase at the moment.

how travel agencies are using social media

Social Media interactions are having an influence on sales, no doubt. At least 11% of travel advisors and
agencies said they have been able to generate at least $100,000 in sales through Social Media efforts.

33% of advisors claimed that using the platforms available had resulted in at least $25,000 in sales over the past 12 months. But there’s an interesting difference here with agencies, of which just 25% achieved similar results. This could be because the role of travel advisor is relatively new compared with an agency, and that the advisor service is more relatable and easy to target towards Social Media-savvy travellers.

Again though, we see that a minority of travel industry professionals are approaching things in a coordinated manner. Tracking sales wasn’t universal. 38% of advisors and 29% of agencies said they “don’t or can’t track sales.”

One agent offered an explanation for this: “It is difficult to draw straight lines from client interaction and a sale. Social media is part of an overall strategy of engagement.”

The discrepancy between there being money to be made via Social Media and a lack of professionals actually tracking sales can be partly explained by our next statistic. When asked about their Social Media objectives, this is what respondents had to say.

As you might expect, gaining new customers was the number one reason that advisors (87%) and agencies (86%) use Social Media. But for agencies, it’s also about ‘building awareness and positioning expertise’ (82%).

Marketing to existing customers (77%) took the second spot for advisors. In total, around 50% of respondents use Social Media as an advertising platform with specific objectives in mind.

All of which suggests there is are myriad reasons to be active on Social Media if you are trying to sell travel. The breadth of those reasons may explain the lack of focus towards either one in particular. Not to mention the fact that these platforms offer a place where you can do all of those things and more simultaneously.

Read more: How To Boost SEO and Build Links For Your Travel Startup

Which Platforms Are Proving Popular?

One major question that travel professionals have when considering Social Media marketing is: Which channels/platforms are best?

With limited resources and several platforms to choose from, it’s important to focus efforts in the right place.

Here are the results indicating the most popular Social Media platforms for travel agencies and advisors.

Which social media platforms do travel agencies use

So what are the headlines? Well, despite what we know about the power of visuals in marketing travel, Instagram sits in second place behind the mighty Facebook.

But the gap between Facebook and the rest is stark. Almost every travel agent or advisor has a Facebook presence. That may say more about Facebook’s dominance than anything else. But it perhaps misses the fact that millennials are abandoning Facebook by the million and switching onto other networks.

This generation is, as we have discussed before, hugely into travel and has growing buying power. And that’s before we mention the coming tsunami that is generation Z.

So let’s take a closer look at the stats. Facebook is by far the dominant social media platform when it comes to the travel agency community. 97% of respondents confirmed that they use it for their business.

Instagram (60%) and LinkedIn (59%) came in second and third respectively. Twitter was used by 38% of respondents followed by YouTube at 28% and Pinterest at 26%.

Again here we see that the travel industry as a whole is neglecting the opportunity to tap into Social Media networks most frequented by younger travellers. That YouTube is the focus of efforts for just 28% of the industry is a big surprise, particularly given its size as a platform and its emphasis on inspirational video content.

The compelling nature of visuals comes to the fore with a stat released by Travel Market Report’s: Agents that said they had sold at least $25,000 via social media in the past year were statistically more likely to use Instagram (72%) than the overall population.

How Are Travel Companies Using Paid Advertising on Social Media?

With so much uncertainty around the use and effectiveness of Social Media to sell travel, it’s not surprising that the percentage of travel companies not running paid adverts is significant: Around half don’t run any kind of paid campaigns.

Travel advisors are less likely to engage in paid advertising on Social Media than agencies, but for those that do, Facebook dominates again. 61% of agencies that run paid ads do so on Facebook. 44% of advisors do the same.

Despite being the go-to platform for millennials and dedicated to visuals, Instagram was used on a paid basis by 10% of advisors and agencies. 5% of both groups said they used paid adverts on LinkedIn, perhaps due to having a focus on business-related travel. It’s also where professionals with money to burn tend to congregate.

Only 3% of advisors and 1% of agencies used paid advertising on YouTube. Is that the definition of untapped potential? 

Final Thoughts

There were some really interesting statistics in there. More travel professionals than we expected couldn’t tell you what a hash tag is. Few utilise SEO tactics in their Social Media campaigns. Facebook is dominating the efforts of many despite it being left behind by the younger generation.

There’s also an obvious shortage of travel agents and advisors who go into Social Media with a plan in mind or any intention to track lead generation and progress. Without those key foundations, it’s difficult to make progress and adjust your methods to improve results.

It’s also difficult to build consistency unless you have a structure in place. And that’s key to growing any type of community following.

But plenty are ahead of the curve and doing things right. Below are the bookings per month made, on average, by agencies and advisors through Social Media platforms.

You can expect these figures to rise in the coming years as travel industry professionals get to grips with how best to harness the power of Social Media.

The Changing Trends of Travel Industry Marketing

Travel industry marketing is changing. And, for better or for worse, travel operators need to adapt. In this blog post we’re going to be taking a closer look at how travel marketing is being turned on its head, what challenges these changes pose to operators in the industry, and how Travelshift software can help you overcome those challenges.  

We’ll start at the beginning. Why is travel marketing being transformed? And what are these emerging trends in travel industry marketing that operators need to get to grips with?

Changing traveller attitudes toward advertising

Quite fairly, we think, travellers now have much higher expectations of brands and operators when it comes to marketing. Younger tourists (-30) in particular are increasingly tech-savvy and spend more time online than any generation in history.

This has several knock-on effects. The first is that brands now need to work harder to grab travellers’ attention. The move away from traditional forms of advertising on TV and in print is well underway.

But it’s not as simple as moving marketing efforts online. Many of today’s internet users are immune to spam campaigns, neon banners and click bait. They’ve seen it all before and won’t be falling for it anytime soon. They are adept at filtering out irrelevance and heading directly to what they’re looking for, fast.

This leaves operators with an obvious challenge: be relevant or get left behind. Be informative and inspiring or be ignored. Be interesting or watch your revenue shrink.

Nowhere is this trend played out more than in the sphere of social media. Platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are unique places where travellers can create their own bubbles of content that are tailored to their ‘likes’ and interests. Let’s look at this in more detail and think about how travel industry marketing needs to adapt.

The growing importance of social media

Social media is the new travel marketers’ battleground. It’s where millions of potential customers are active, engaged and there to be influenced and sold to. But the increasing importance of social media platforms is forcing marketers to adapt. In the travel industry, it’s not enough to spread links to your products and special offers.

Travel operators need to be more creative than that.

Content is King

Instead, operators are pivoting towards creating long-term relationships with potential customers, through the creation and promotion of inspiring content. It’s this element that is seeing a massive rise in terms of budget and focus.

We’ve previously highlighted the importance of content marketing, and quite rightly, too. This is an area where spending is on the up because it’s an easy way for travel brands to connect, engage and grow an audience. According to a Skift report on the state of content marketing, “the aspirational appeal of such content, combined with its increased credibility, helps it succeed with travel customers.”

But it’s not enough to simply produce content. First travel operators have to define what content even is, and what kinds of content they’re going to use to spread their message or philosophy.

And once that has been done, and content has been created there are still plenty of challenges. But first…

What counts as content?

The answer to the above question is largely subjective. For many travel brands, the simple act of posting something on social media might be seen as content marketing. For others, it might be the production of a GIF, eBook or podcast to go alongside a new product release.

All of these possibilities have an element of truth about them. Sure, anything can be content, whether it’s 140 characters in a Tweet or a 10-minute promotional video. But to understand what content marketing is really driving at we have to think about its purpose. Only once the aim is clear can travel brands think closely on the message and the medium.

What is the point of content marketing?

Content marketing is not just about putting your stuff in people’s faces. It’s about become established, a leader, a respected voice in your field.

In many cases, it’s entirely separate from the direct-sales marketing we’re all familiar with. Instead of pushing a specific product with an in-your-face advert, content marketing aims to build an audience and grow an operator’s influence.

It’s not supposed to be marketing-y.

Instead, the fundamental principle goes something like this: If you, as a travel provider, produce content that entertains, engages and informs your target market, they will be more inclined to buy your products and trust your brand as a result.

We’re a lot more cynical than we used to be when shopping. Our relationship with advertising has changed. Travellers now appreciate honesty and authenticity. They want the truth, and enough information to make informed decisions.

The concept is simple and it’s proven to be effective. And there’s another reason that travel brands are investing so much in fresh content…

Perpetuating traffic: The by-product of great content

Great content is great for SEO – there’s no getting around that fact. On the one hand, travel operators can create extensive written content that will be shared and viewed by thousands of readers. This, in turn, will generate more sales through a higher amount of traffic to the website in question.

But more content also boosts traffic organically by bumping agencies up the search engine rankings. Because of this, a by-product of any content marketing efforts is usually in an increase in relevant traffic and a natural growth in sales.

And it’s not only written content that boosts your traffic. Search engines also take into account an operator’s popularity on social media platforms and the reach of their brand beyond a simple website. This means that having a strong presence as a content creator on sites such as Youtube is also highly beneficial.

From this, we can clearly see that content marketing is an easy way to perpetuate traffic and sales. This also goes some way to answering one of the questions posed above. Namely, what kind of content should travel operators be using as part of marketing campaigns?

Content marketing in the travel industry: How and where?

So the two main questions here are what types of content should travel operators be using to reach potential customers, and where should they be employing these tactics?

The How

‘Content’, as we have seen, comes in many different forms. But to be an effective content marketer in the travel industry you need to understand which of those forms pushes the buttons of prospective travellers. More often than not marketing in this industry is about aspiration and inspiration.

via GIPHY

For that reason, content often needs to be visual and engaging. Sure, there’s room for thought-provoking writeups and detailed travel guides. But pictures still say a thousand words. Videos say even more.

So let’s focus on media content for the time being. It’s not only that pictures, videos and GIFs have the potential to highlight a product or destination better than words ever can. In an online world where we sift through huge amounts of information in seconds – whether it’s on timelines or scrolling through a website – media content offers immediacy. A quick fix, a powerful punch of inspiration.

Because they force an immediate reaction, snippets of visual media stand out on social media and general websites. It’s a medium that people can engage within seconds without complication.

If something can be engaged with quickly on social media platforms, it’s more likely to be shared and spread. As well as being increasingly good for SEO, this peer to peer sharing can be the foundation of the authenticity a travel brand is trying to develop. Even in the digital world, a share or recommendation is a pretty big compliment. It suggests that a travel operator is doing something right.

content marketing travel

Take Facebook, for example. The world’s most popular social media platform has seen a huge rise in the use of video content on its pages.

Twitter last year introduced its new GIF search feature, encouraging users to share media content to improve the quality of their tweets. And then you’ve got Youtube, the video behemoth that’s quietly become the second-largest search engine in the world, with countless hours of video content uploaded and watched every day by people all over the world.

Youtube also gives travel operators the ability to create channels, which fans can then subscribe to and watch regularly. That same video content can then be shared across social media platforms. Which leads us to an interesting question:

If we agree that visual media content is 1. the most effective at portraying aspiration and inspiration that travel lovers love and 2. growing rapidly in terms of engagement across the web….

Should every travel operator be a media organisation?

It’s difficult to get away from this as a conclusion. But it needn’t be an intimidating one for those working in the travel industry. As the traditional need for travel agents has evolved, customers are looking for more than great prices. They want information, insight and inspiration. If a travel operator can offer those things, the need for conventional marketing could disappear completely.

The Where

A few of the platforms we’ve already mentioned are prime for content marketing campaigns dedicated to travel. Facebook and Twitter, in particular, offer easy avenues to viral content if the media is engaging enough.

Instagram content marketing travel

Instagram is the perfect platform to build a loyal band of followers.

But other platforms, including Instagram and Youtube, are also proving popular arenas for content marketing – just with a slightly different edge. Although photos and videos can also go viral on these platforms, the focus is more on building a fanbase, a group or subscribers or followers that receive regular updates and believe in the message travel brands are portraying.

But of course, it’s not only on social media platforms that content marketing can boost travel brands.

You’ll struggle to find travel operators these days who don’t provide some kind of insight, information or inspiration to potential customers, free of charge. Most often this will be in the form of blog posts, travel guides and other shareable content.

The post you’re reading right now could be deemed a form of content marketing, for example. We’re not simply trying to sell you our services (indeed, we haven’t even mentioned them yet) – we’re addressing the issues of interest to our target market, establishing ourselves as visionaries in our chosen field and generally informing, entertaining and inspiring the next generation of travel startups.

Those same techniques can be found in blog posts, website content, email newsletters and more.

Things to think about

With the move toward content marketing, different challenges are now being faced by operators in the travel industry.

The biggest challenge is obvious: How do we make and measure great content? 

Although we’ve highlighted the popularity of images and video on the platforms above, that’s by no means the end of the line. What type of content depends very much on the audience and product in question.

Another huge challenge for travel brands is finding talented content creators, whether that’s writers, video editors or creative thinkers – they don’t just grow on trees, after all. Because travel businesses are primarily setup to give their customers memorable experiences, content creation is not usually an area of expertise.

Perhaps for that reason, we’ve seen an interesting trend develop in travel alongside the popularity of social media: partnering with influencers.

In many ways, these influencers provide a shortcut to exposure. The idea is simple: pay a well-known, influential figure to feature your product or service, and reap the rewards by reaching their audience directly.

Read more: The Power of Influencers in the Travel Industry

But working with influencers comes with an interesting set of challenges.How do you go about choosing who to work with? And what’s the best way to measure their effectiveness and ensure high-quality results?

What if you could create your own ‘influencers’ and measure their impact on your travel business in real time?

Where Travelshift Comes In…

travelshift-logo-blue-horiz-big

You might be wondering how all of the above could possibly be related to Travelshift. As you may or may not know, we build travel marketplaces. We’re not a content marketing agency. We don’t specialise in creating original media, so what do we know about content marketing?

We lied about only building marketplaces. We also build communities. And we’ve pioneered a whole new type of content marketing off that back of it. We call it community-driven content, and it works like this:

Our proprietary marketplace software allows our clients to build travel platforms with a difference. Built into these platforms are all the tools you need to bring together a community of writers and bloggers. In the first application of our software, our community of Icelandic locals, bloggers and travellers helped (and still helps) drive a huge amount of traffic through our GuidetoIceland marketplace.

You can read more about our GuidetoIceland marketplace in the case study.

With our community-driven framework, the authenticity and insight of locals and genuine travellers do plenty of the content marketing for you.

Interested in finding out more? Get in touch today!

The Travel Industry Must Adapt for Generation Z

Do you remember what kind of things you did for entertainment when you were younger? Take a moment to think about how you spent your free time as a teenager. You probably read books, played outside, made entertainment from nothing at all. And why? Well for one thing, the internet likely wasn’t in existence/a dominant source of entertainment in your home. Times were different, the digital world we know today was only just kicking to gear, and the result was a notion of self-entertainment that relied heavily upon imagination.

So how is this relevant to the travel industry, and where does the concept of imagination come in? More on imagination later. The main point we’re trying to make is that the young people of today are different. They’ve grown up in times of incredible technological advancement. And as their power as travel purchasers looms on the horizon, it’s becoming more and more clear that their behaviour, attitudes and expectations are completely different to generations of years gone by. Sure, every new generation has its quirks, but as the focus shifts from millennials to Generation Z, travel operators will need to adapt for this emerging customer base more than you might think.

Technology: A challenge and an opportunity

generation z travel industry

The relationship between Generation Z-ers and travel is and will be linked by technology. As a generation that’s grown up alongside rapid advancements in all things tech, the connected world has certainly left its mark. Teenagers today are the most tech savvy generation around. On top of that, having grown up in the immersive world of social media, advanced video games and platforms such as Youtube, this is a generation that takes technology and innovation for granted. For teenagers all over the world, these incredible advances have been a part of their lives for as long as they can remember. The digital world that they spend so much time in is all they’ve ever known.

Attention spans are at an all-time low – just eight seconds for Generation Z-ers according to some research. This means that things happen quickly. Content is engaged with and judged in a flash. Generation Z has been exposed to and shaped by the concept of instantaneous results and reactions. Just look at Snapchat, along with the growing popularity of memes and blink-and-you’ll-miss-it video content on platforms such as Facebook and Youtube.

But that’s not to say that the teenagers of today are a bunch of mindless kids who can’t focus on something for any longer than a goldfish can. That would be completely the wrong way of approaching this and missing the point entirely. This is instead about Generation Z’s ability to process information:

Mimi Turner, marketing director at The Lad Bible said the following:

“People talk a lot about this generation having a short attention span. That’s exactly what grown-ups say when they don’t understand something. This audience are extreme navigators of superior efficiency. They are machines at knowing what they want. They are highly sophisticated decision makers. They are efficient and marketers and brands need to catch up with that.”

Imagination and travel

In the opening to this post, we touched on the importance of imagination to the travel industry. Travel is, of course, driven by ambition, by a passion for exploration and a desire to experience new places. The imagination is where all of these wonderful emotions collide to form concrete goals that can be aimed at and aspired to.

The digital natives of Generation Z are set to have an intriguing relationship with travel and imagination. On the one hand, the next generation is touted as being more globally-minded than even Millennials. This suggests that travel will be a priority. But having said that, there’s an argument that the close relationship with technology we’ve talked about could be a barrier to those travel aspirations we currently take for granted.

“Only daydreaming while waiting for devices to recharge”

Why could this be? For starters, take a moment to appreciate how immersive and all-encompassing the digital world of technology is becoming. With the latest games, you can already explore the world (and beyond) in high definition with your friends by your virtual side. Technology isn’t (yet) an adequate substitute for the real thing, but how many teenagers are spending their days gazing longingly at pictures of Paris or Rome or New York instead of entertaining themselves via different means? The short answer is not many. You might even say there’s so much damn entertainment around that travel will fall down the list of priorities. After all, if you can have fun, a social life and experience new things through a screen does often expensive travel take a backseat?

Speaking with Campaign, Gerry Whiteside, co-director of P2 Games neatly summarises this debate. Previous generations have seen our imaginations shaped through books with a beginning, middle and an end. The infinite nature of the internet is both an opportunity but also pretty darn frightening. As Whiteside says, “There is a fabulous opportunity for children to be more creative as a result of technology. But I also have a feeling that whenever their device’s battery runs out, the next generation will only find time for daydreaming while waiting for it to recharge.”

Generation Z is coming – Is the travel industry ready?

In the next year or so the first members of this generation are going to be in a position to make travel decisions and exercise their enormous spending power around the world. So what does this tidal wave of tech-savvy youngsters mean for travel operators? And how can services and offerings be adapted to connect with the most connected generation ever?

Clearly things need to change. In a recent piece in Travel Weekly discussing how to make travel products appeal to the next generation, Miles Morgan admits that “As an industry, we have one of the most engaging products – holidays and holiday destinations – but we fail to cut through and engage people enough to grab their interest.”

The way we see it, there are two ways that travel operators can switch things up to appeal to younger customers. The first involves the way that products are marketed, and the second the medium through which that marketing happens. Now, that may sound like the same thing said in two different ways, but there’s a distinction. Honest…

Travel marketing needs to adapt to Generation Z

Even in the travel industry, taking customers and their willingness to travel for granted is a big mistake. As we’ve discussed, with the next generation of travellers it may take more persuasion than normal. That persuasion needs to be carefully planned and well thought through. Most importantly of all, it needs to be tailored to suit the behaviour and expectations of young buyers. We’re talking short-form video content through mediums such as Snapchat and Youtube; content that’s simple, shareable, visual and inspiring. Easier said than done, but the first generation of truly digital natives have got plenty of distractions to flick between. Travel operators need to cut through the noise.

The next generation of travellers spends more time watching video than any other generation in history.

The next generation of travellers spends more time watching video than any other generation in history.

They’re a social bunch too, so community driven content that encourages a relationship between your brand and each individual is the way forward.

And then we get to the mediums through which this marketing should happen. This is where we fight fire with fire. As much as we’ve been saying that digital technology poses a risk to the travel aspirations of members of Generation Z, the irony is that technology can also provide the solution. For example:

Harness the power of instant messaging

You might want to tap into fast-growing messaging platforms to offer a more personalised service. This is a generation used to having instant access to solutions and information. Anything less than that kind of speed is likely to put them off from dealing with you on a repeat basis.  

Enter their world

The real world should never pale in comparison to the virtual world. Travel offers so many opportunities and experiences that can change all of our lives for the better. If it takes a little technology to prove that and get Generation Z-ers interested, then that’s no problem. Why not create virtual reality travel content around your products to make them more enticing and immersive to a younger audience?

Being internet-savvy entails that this is a customer group that can spot cheesy campaigns from a mile off. Instead, members of Generation Z are far more likely to listen to the advice of their peers and people whose opinions they respect. Subtly tapping into the power of market influencers, whether it’s Youtube stars or Instagram giants, is definitely worth considering.

Adapt your products

Away from the techniques of marketing, one simple way to appeal to the next tech-savvy generation is to make your products as tech-friendly as possible. Generation Z is used to viewing the internet as any other utility – just like running a tap for water or turning the heating on. If you can incorporate this level of connectivity into your trips, along with other digital touches, from contactless payments to electronic keys, biometrics and (hell, why not) robot butlers, you’ll appeal both to their imagination and their love of efficiency.

Is the travel industry ready for generation z. It will probably need to adapt.

Our versatile travel marketplace platform

We’re incredibly proud of the travel marketplace platform we’ve built from scratch. One of its key features is that it allows you to build a marketplace that’s community driven and packed with relevant content from sources your customers will trust and engage with – Certainly one way to appeal to the Generation Z travellers on the horizon. Get in touch with us today to find out more and get started on your own travel platform.

Social Trends in the Travel Industry

social trends in the travel industry

There’s something about travel that appeals to our deepest desires and natural instincts. Seeing a friend’s Instagram photo of a trip to Paris is a bit like watching someone devour an ice cream on a hot day. You see it, you want it. That basic tendency is at the heart of what’s driving social trends in the travel agency today. A shared experience is a step closer to an experience that’s all your own. So maybe that’s why we love to window shop for holidays more than any other type of expenditure.

In a recent article in Marketing Land, the incredible amount of social travel data out there online was put under the microscope. Marketer Chris Kerns drew three separate conclusions from the findings of his research. We’re going to look through his analysis and suggest how travel brands might adapt to meet the changing needs and behaviour of their customers.

Read more

Why a Facebook Video Strategy Can Boost Your Travel Brand

video content travel

When we last checked towards the end of 2015, social media giant Facebook was racking up around 8 billion video views every day. Yep, you read that right: 8 billion. And that’s up almost 100% from as recently as April last year. This is of course partly because of the new autoplay function. And while this may make newsfeed videos difficult to escape, research has shown that your average video is far more likely to receive attention than any other type of media – especially once it has been optimised for mobile.

Read more